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Whole 30: Round Two!

So Nic & I are going back to the basics.  Especially with the holidays and running around trying to move, both of us working two jobs, and everything else going on right now, we just haven’t felt right, recently.

We got a little grain crazy, my sugar dragon came back, etc.  I’m also cutting down drastically on caffeine {no coffee, only tea}.

So we’re running through the Whole 30 again!

Today was Day 1.  Not much to report, really.  I’ve had a headache all day, though that could be the caffeine, the lack of sugar, or because I’m terribly exhausted, lately.  Especially today, since last night was New Year’s Eve.

Accidentally had a piece of chewing gum, just popped it in my mouth without thinking first.  :/  Which is probably another habit to break.  Gum is bad for you, anyway.

Excited to feel better!

Photoset

swegener:

Speaking of different body shapes. These are all basically peak human bodies. 

How come 99% of them don’t conform to what the entertainment industry tells us is the perfect body?

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backonpointe:

internal-acceptance-movement:

HOW TO TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF DURING A BAD BODY IMAGE DAY:
1. Recognize that fat isn’t a feeling.
There are always underlying emotions that we attach to feeling fat. When the “I feel fat” thoughts start up, try to identify what you’re feeling underneath the body dissatisfaction. Are you feeling lonely? Anxious? Invisible? Scared? Ashamed? Inadequate? Whatever the feelings are recognize that they are separate from your body. 
2. Treat yourself as you would a friend.
Because it’s difficult to be kind to ourselves in the moment when the body hating thoughts take over, try responding to your thoughts as if you were supporting a friend. What would you say to someone you loved who was battling your same struggle with body image?
You wouldn’t tell them to not eat for the day in order to compensate for what they ate the previous night. You wouldn’t tell them to punish themselves for their body size through over-exercise, self-harm, or abusive eating habits. You wouldn’t tell them they were worthless or unloveable because of their weight. So why do you tell yourself these things? Break the cycle and start treating yourself like a friend—you deserve that kindness and love from everyone, especially yourself. 
3. Recognize that you are so much more than the size of your body. 
What you look like does not define you. It doesn’t discount your worth as a human being. You are so much more than a number on the scale. As a living, breathing, feeling human being you have inherent value. You are special and important and loved. You exist and therefore you matter.
Your appearance is such a small part of who you are, and it certainly doesn’t warrant enough power to discount the person you are inside. You aren’t your body or your weight—you are your goals and dreams and passions and values. You are your strengths and talents and insight. You are a soul and a spirit and a force of nature. Your body does not define you. 
4. Shift your focus from the external to the internal.
Make a list of all the people you look up to and are inspired by—not because of their weight or appearance, but because of who they are and what they do. Write out all the qualities they have that make you appreciate and value them.
Use the list as a reminder that it’s the internal things—our dreams and passions and goals and morals and insight and character—that truly define who we are and draw people to us; not how we look.
You are no exception to this. Try making your own list of things you like about yourself that have nothing to do with appearance or body size. If you have a difficult time creating one, ask some friends and family to help you. 
5. Think about what you want to be remembered for after you die.
I don’t want people to remember me for what I looked like, what size jeans I wore, or what I weighed. I want to be remembered for the person I am. I want to be remembered as someone who brought about positive change in the world. I want to be remembered as loving friend, partner, and family member. I want to be remembered for my passions and my creativity and my strength. I want to be remembered as someone who made a difference. What do you want your legacy to be? Chances are, it doesn’t have to do with weight.
6. Instead of focusing on the size of your body, start focusing on what your body allows you to do. 
The human body is an incredible force. When we get caught up in the number on the scale and size of clothes however, we forget just how lucky we are to have a fully functioning vehicle to engage in life with. So stop hating your body for the way it looks and start acknowledging and appreciating your body for all that it allows you to do.
Make a list of each activity and feat your body helps you to partake in and accomplish. If you want to be even more specific, list out each body part and describe all the things you wouldn’t be able to do without it. Your body is strong, powerful, and beautiful, regardless of it’s size. Choose to treat it with love, compassion, and gratitude instead of hate and judgement. 
7. Challenge your negative thoughts.
You may not be able to change the way you feel about your body today, tomorrow, or a month from now, but you can begin the process by challenging the thoughts in the moment. Write out a dialogue between your negative voice and a healthy voice. If you have a hard time coming up with positive counters to the negative thoughts, pretend that you are speaking positively about a friend or loved one.
Even if you don’t believe the things you say to counter the voice, it’s still important to speak out against it, because each time you argue with the thoughts, you are taking away some of their power and reclaiming your own. The more you challenge the thoughts, the less you will believe them. The more you argue back, the easier fighting the voice will become. 
8. Allow yourself to feel your feelings.
There is a lot of built up energy and emotion underlying the way we feel about our bodies. Holding in how we feel or engaging in behaviors to numb out may make us feel better in the moment, but in the long run, it doesn’t remedy the pain we feel. It doesn’t make us feel better and it keeps us stuck.  
Releasing the energy and painful emotions underlying our body shame requires us to feel our feelings. Whether that means throwing a tantrum on the floor, venting to a friend on the phone, punching a pillow, screaming in your car, or crying in bed, you need to allow yourself to feel your feelings. Let go of the judgement you have about what you feel and recognize that you are feeling these things for a reason. Give yourself permission to release your emotions and let everything out. 
9. Do self care.
When you’re struggling with body image, distract yourself with healthy coping mechanisms. Take a bubble bath, get a message, ask for a back scratch, cuddle with a pet, make plans with a supportive friend, watch your favorite movie, get a manicure, listening to calming music, do deep breathing—whatever it is, make sure it’s something self-soothing and helps you get out of your head.
10. Be kind with yourself.
You may not be able to control the way you feel about your body, but you can control what you do in response to how you feel.
Instead of beating yourself up, you can choose to treat yourself with compassion. Instead of engaging in unhealthy and abusive behaviors, you can choose to do self-care. Instead of treating your body as an enemy, you can choose to treat it as a friend. Instead of isolating yourself, you can choose to reach out for support and surround yourself with positive people who make you feel loved and accepted. Instead of agreeing with the negative thoughts, you can choose to challenge them. 
***You have more power than you think—don’t let the way you feel about your body keep you from living.
Coping with bad body image days may not be easy, but it is possible.
Don’t give up.
You aren’t alone.
Things can and will get better.

Always reblog.

backonpointe:

internal-acceptance-movement:

HOW TO TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF DURING A BAD BODY IMAGE DAY:

1. Recognize that fat isn’t a feeling.

There are always underlying emotions that we attach to feeling fat. When the “I feel fat” thoughts start up, try to identify what you’re feeling underneath the body dissatisfaction. Are you feeling lonely? Anxious? Invisible? Scared? Ashamed? Inadequate? Whatever the feelings are recognize that they are separate from your body. 

2. Treat yourself as you would a friend.

Because it’s difficult to be kind to ourselves in the moment when the body hating thoughts take over, try responding to your thoughts as if you were supporting a friend. What would you say to someone you loved who was battling your same struggle with body image?

You wouldn’t tell them to not eat for the day in order to compensate for what they ate the previous night. You wouldn’t tell them to punish themselves for their body size through over-exercise, self-harm, or abusive eating habits. You wouldn’t tell them they were worthless or unloveable because of their weight. So why do you tell yourself these things? Break the cycle and start treating yourself like a friend—you deserve that kindness and love from everyone, especially yourself. 

3. Recognize that you are so much more than the size of your body. 

What you look like does not define you. It doesn’t discount your worth as a human being. You are so much more than a number on the scale. As a living, breathing, feeling human being you have inherent value. You are special and important and loved. You exist and therefore you matter.

Your appearance is such a small part of who you are, and it certainly doesn’t warrant enough power to discount the person you are inside. You aren’t your body or your weight—you are your goals and dreams and passions and values. You are your strengths and talents and insight. You are a soul and a spirit and a force of nature. Your body does not define you. 

4. Shift your focus from the external to the internal.

Make a list of all the people you look up to and are inspired by—not because of their weight or appearance, but because of who they are and what they do. Write out all the qualities they have that make you appreciate and value them.

Use the list as a reminder that it’s the internal things—our dreams and passions and goals and morals and insight and character—that truly define who we are and draw people to us; not how we look.

You are no exception to this. Try making your own list of things you like about yourself that have nothing to do with appearance or body size. If you have a difficult time creating one, ask some friends and family to help you. 

5. Think about what you want to be remembered for after you die.

I don’t want people to remember me for what I looked like, what size jeans I wore, or what I weighed. I want to be remembered for the person I am. I want to be remembered as someone who brought about positive change in the world. I want to be remembered as loving friend, partner, and family member. I want to be remembered for my passions and my creativity and my strength. I want to be remembered as someone who made a difference. What do you want your legacy to be? Chances are, it doesn’t have to do with weight.

6. Instead of focusing on the size of your body, start focusing on what your body allows you to do. 

The human body is an incredible force. When we get caught up in the number on the scale and size of clothes however, we forget just how lucky we are to have a fully functioning vehicle to engage in life with. So stop hating your body for the way it looks and start acknowledging and appreciating your body for all that it allows you to do.

Make a list of each activity and feat your body helps you to partake in and accomplish. If you want to be even more specific, list out each body part and describe all the things you wouldn’t be able to do without it. Your body is strong, powerful, and beautiful, regardless of it’s size. Choose to treat it with love, compassion, and gratitude instead of hate and judgement. 

7. Challenge your negative thoughts.

You may not be able to change the way you feel about your body today, tomorrow, or a month from now, but you can begin the process by challenging the thoughts in the moment. Write out a dialogue between your negative voice and a healthy voice. If you have a hard time coming up with positive counters to the negative thoughts, pretend that you are speaking positively about a friend or loved one.

Even if you don’t believe the things you say to counter the voice, it’s still important to speak out against it, because each time you argue with the thoughts, you are taking away some of their power and reclaiming your own. The more you challenge the thoughts, the less you will believe them. The more you argue back, the easier fighting the voice will become. 

8. Allow yourself to feel your feelings.

There is a lot of built up energy and emotion underlying the way we feel about our bodies. Holding in how we feel or engaging in behaviors to numb out may make us feel better in the moment, but in the long run, it doesn’t remedy the pain we feel. It doesn’t make us feel better and it keeps us stuck.  

Releasing the energy and painful emotions underlying our body shame requires us to feel our feelings. Whether that means throwing a tantrum on the floor, venting to a friend on the phone, punching a pillow, screaming in your car, or crying in bed, you need to allow yourself to feel your feelings. Let go of the judgement you have about what you feel and recognize that you are feeling these things for a reason. Give yourself permission to release your emotions and let everything out. 

9. Do self care.

When you’re struggling with body image, distract yourself with healthy coping mechanisms. Take a bubble bath, get a message, ask for a back scratch, cuddle with a pet, make plans with a supportive friend, watch your favorite movie, get a manicure, listening to calming music, do deep breathing—whatever it is, make sure it’s something self-soothing and helps you get out of your head.

10. Be kind with yourself.

You may not be able to control the way you feel about your body, but you can control what you do in response to how you feel.

Instead of beating yourself up, you can choose to treat yourself with compassion. Instead of engaging in unhealthy and abusive behaviors, you can choose to do self-care. Instead of treating your body as an enemy, you can choose to treat it as a friend. Instead of isolating yourself, you can choose to reach out for support and surround yourself with positive people who make you feel loved and accepted. Instead of agreeing with the negative thoughts, you can choose to challenge them. 

***You have more power than you thinkdon’t let the way you feel about your body keep you from living.

Coping with bad body image days may not be easy, but it is possible.

Don’t give up.

You aren’t alone.

Things can and will get better.

Always reblog.

(via say-no-to-thinspo)

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I’ve always said this about myself.

I’ve always said this about myself.

Quote
"It was obviously an unfortunate incident. It kind of made me sad on two accounts. One was that I was very sad that we live in an age when someone takes a picture of another person in a vulnerable moment and rather than delete it, and do the decent thing, sells it. And I’m sorry that we live in a culture that commodifies sexuality of unwilling participants, which takes us back to ‘Les Mis,’ because that’s what my character is."

This is what happens when you ask Anne Hathaway about that time she accidentally showed her Princess Diary to a bunch of photographers.

This was some tenth-degree black belt media judo here. Read the setup:

Matt Lauer doesn’t mess around. When he greeted Anne Hathaway on the Today show this morning, the host got right down to business: “Good to see you,” he said. “Seen a lot of you lately.”

She didn’t get defensive, she didn’t get flustered, and she brought the conversation back to her primary reason for being on the show in the first place. Damn.

(via caterinasforzas)

(Source: entertainmentweekly, via celaenasardothiens)

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katelucia:

Jada Pinkett-Smith is aware of the critics that frown up their noses at the way she raises her daughter, Willow. Willow cuts, dyes and styles her hair as she pleases, a fact that bothers many who feel girls shouldn’t have that much control over their appearance at such a young age.
Jada decided to address the criticism in a Facebook post:

“A letter to a friend…This subject is old but I have never answered it in its entirety. And even with this post it will remain incomplete. The question why I would LET Willow cut her hair. First the LET must be challenged. This is a world where women, girls are constantly reminded that they don’t belong to themselves; that their bodies are not their own, nor their power or self determination. I made a promise to endow my little girl with the power to always know that her body, spirit and her mind are HER domain. Willow cut her hair because her beauty, her value, her worth is not measured by the length of her hair. It’s also a statement that claims that even little girls have the RIGHT to own themselves and should not be a slave to even their mother’s deepest insecurities, hopes and desires. Even little girls should not be a slave to the preconceived ideas of what a culture believes a little girl should be.”

katelucia:

Jada Pinkett-Smith is aware of the critics that frown up their noses at the way she raises her daughter, Willow. Willow cuts, dyes and styles her hair as she pleases, a fact that bothers many who feel girls shouldn’t have that much control over their appearance at such a young age.

Jada decided to address the criticism in a Facebook post:

“A letter to a friend…This subject is old but I have never answered it in its entirety. And even with this post it will remain incomplete. The question why I would LET Willow cut her hair. First the LET must be challenged. This is a world where women, girls are constantly reminded that they don’t belong to themselves; that their bodies are not their own, nor their power or self determination. I made a promise to endow my little girl with the power to always know that her body, spirit and her mind are HER domain. Willow cut her hair because her beauty, her value, her worth is not measured by the length of her hair. It’s also a statement that claims that even little girls have the RIGHT to own themselves and should not be a slave to even their mother’s deepest insecurities, hopes and desires. Even little girls should not be a slave to the preconceived ideas of what a culture believes a little girl should be.”

(via ohmytheon)

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Birthdays & Special Occasions

My sister’s birthday was this week, and it’s the first real special occasion that I’ve come across since starting the Whole 30.  I mean, there’s our weekly hanging out with friends movie or D&D nights {don’t judge}, but nothing like this.

So, we always go to Johnny Carino’s for her birthday - an Italian countryside restaurant - and since it’s kinda hard to escape grains and cheese in Italian cooking {I would say it’s impastable!}, I decided to go with some grains and no cheese.

——

I did overgrain a little.  Maybe just a wee bit.  But how often am I going to have that awesome bread you dip in the oil & garlic?!  Once a year, that’s how often.

So I did the dippy bread, then a little house salad {boring, without fruit}, and then angel hair spaghetti & meatballs.  YES.  For the win.  No cheese, just good starchy grainy pasta and MEAT and TOMATO SAUCE that’s probably filled with sugar.  Though it didn’t really taste like it.

I also got to feel extremely pretentious and order a sparkling mineral water, which was fab and came with a lime wedge.

——

Then since it’s a birthday, we did order a slice of their lemon creme cake that we - a family of 5 - split, each getting a bite or so.  Since it’s a bite and it’s a special occasion, I didn’t mind the little dairy in the creme.

THEN, since it’s my family and we don’t believe in just one birthday cake {no, really, it’s a thing, now}, we also dipped a little into the ice cream cake at home.

How did I deal with this?

I ate the cake and icing {another vice of mine?: frosting} and had a taste of the ice cream, but generally left it for someone else.  I had just enough of a taste of everything to satisfy the urge and hardly any dairy.

I pretty much felt okay that night and the next day, though not awesome.  Stomach felt a bit solid and heavy, but I think I’m getting back to normal.

——

So, again, samples, bites, and special occasions not becoming a regular thing.  Also, learn how to distinguish between a special occasion and because you feel like it.

There’s a difference, people.

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Updates Since the Whole 30

Dairy

I’ve still been avoiding dairy as much as possible.  I know that it makes me feel bad and I also know that it tends to be a “food with no brakes” for me, so I don’t mind too much. {Seriously, I could eat an entire block of cheese in a sitting.  It should also be noted here that juice is another “FwNB” for me.  If I could eat cheese & juice for every meal for the rest of my life, I’d be happy.  I would feel miserable all the time and much heavier, but my tastebuds would be happy.}

I just don’t think it’d worth not feeling good.  During the Whole 30 - and for the most part, afterwards - I’ve felt better than I ever have.  Ever.  And healthier, too.  So no, not having dairy all the time is totally fine.

I’ll still have it occasionally, for sure, just not like I used to.

Nic’s working on reintroducing it to his diet, because he doesn’t want to be without it. And that’s his prerogative and that’s fine.  I just don’t see it the same way.  :)

Grains

It’s kind of the same with grains.  I’ve had mixed results with grains, mostly the gluten ones.  Sometimes I feel fine, and other times I feel the same as when I have dairy.  Last night, for example, friends brought pizza over, and I asked for a crust off someone.  I don’t know if it was the crust or something else, but I didn’t feel great.  Even this morning, I still feel a little off.

But again, I’m not really planning on eating them often.  Just a few times a week, maybe.  I’d rather stick to my paleo stuffs.

Everything Else

Honestly, I haven’t really noticed anything else affecting me.  I will, however, be discussing paleo pizza and how to handle special occasions in the next post.  HUZZAH!

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Non-Gluten Grains, Day 1

Well, that was weird.

I’ve not been sleeping well, lately.  Part of it is stress, I’m sure, and part of it is because we’re having to keep the house hotter than normal {by, like, a lot} because our air conditioner needs freon, and the rest … I don’t know.

So I don’t really know if I can contribute my awful night last night to the corn chips we had at dinner or if it should be chalked up as “not been sleeping well, lately.”

We don’t plan on having corn or chips, like, EVER, so I’m not too worried about it.  Just need to know that it may eff me up.

——

We had paleo nachos last night {SO GOOD}, which basically means meat, peppers, spices {not the packet}, and salsa plus these non-paleo corn chips we used for scooping.

I felt pretty great for a while, no big change in how I was feeling, but I got a very slight headache about an hour later.  It lasted about 2 hrs total, then went away.

Not entirely sure it was the chips, but we’ll assume.

I also had a really awful night’s sleep.  No idea why.

I tossed, I turned, I apparently woke up and whined at Nick some, I complained - in my sleep - about how hot it was, I tossed & turned some more.  Then had a really hard time waking up this morning.  I was EXHAUSTED, but I didn’t want to sleep.

Rough.

——

So, no idea.  We’re trying rice today {I don’t really care about it, but since Nic wants to try, here we go!} so I’ll have to report back with my findings.

After that, it’s 1-2 recovery days and then gluten grains!